Memorial Day – A Time of Remembrance

From Controversial Times:

Memorial

As part of our Memorial Day tribute, we thought it would be prudent to look back at a few of the heroes that have fought and died for our country. Here are two stories of amazing heroism, bravery, and the ultimate sacrifice made by extraordinary Americans.

First Lieutenant James A. Gardner (Feb 7, 1943 – Feb 7, 1966). United States Army, Vietnam War

17878_gardner11st Lt Gardner showed extreme bravery and his actions likely saved numerous American lives. Gardner carried out these acts, and perished, on his 23rd birthday.

His Medal of Honor Citation reads “For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty.”

1st Lt. Gardner’s platoon was advancing to relieve a company of the 1st Battalion that had been pinned down for several hours by a numerically superior enemy force in the village of My Canh, Vietnam. The enemy occupied a series of strongly fortified bunker positions which were mutually supporting and expertly concealed. Approaches to the position were well covered by an integrated pattern of fire including automatic weapons, machine guns and mortars. Air strikes and artillery placed on the fortifications had little effect. 1st Lt. Gardner’s platoon was to relieve the friendly company by encircling and destroying the enemy force.

1st Lt. Gardner’s platoon was to relieve the friendly company by encircling and destroying the enemy force. Even as it moved to begin the attack, the platoon was under heavy enemy fire. During the attack, the enemy fire intensified. Leading the assault and disregarding his own safety, 1st Lt. Gardner charged through a withering hail of fire across an open rice paddy. On reaching the first bunker he destroyed it with a grenade and without hesitation dashed to the second bunker and eliminated it by tossing a grenade inside.

Then, crawling swiftly along the dike of a rice paddy, he reached the third bunker. Before he could arm a grenade, the enemy gunner leaped forth, firing at him. 1st Lt. Gardner instantly returned the fire and killed the enemy gunner at a distance of 6 feet. Following the seizure of the main enemy position, he reorganized the platoon to continue the attack. Advancing to the new assault position, the platoon was pinned down by an enemy machine gun emplaced in a fortified bunker.

1st Lt. Gardner immediately collected several grenades and charged the enemy position, firing his rifle as he advanced to neutralize the defenders. He dropped a grenade into the bunker and vaulted beyond. As the bunker blew up, he came under fire again. Rolling into a ditch to gain cover, he moved toward the new source of fire. Nearing the position, he leaped from the ditch and advanced with a grenade in one hand and firing his rifle with the other. He was gravely wounded just before he reached the bunker, but with a last valiant effort he staggered forward and destroyed the bunker, and its defenders with a grenade.

Although he fell dead on the rim of the bunker, his extraordinary actions so inspired the men of his platoon that they resumed the attack and completely routed the enemy. 1st Lt. Gardner’s conspicuous gallantry were in the highest traditions of the U.S. Army.

 

Lieutenant Michael Murphy (May 7, 1976 – June 28, 2005), United States Navy, Operation Enduring Freedom, Global War on Terror

Michael MurphyMade famous from the book and subsequent movie of teammate Marcus Luttrell, Lieutenant Michael Murphy stepped from cover into clear sight during a raging gun battle that had already killed two of his teammates – and he did it knowing he would likely die but that his actions would save the lone surviving member of the 4-man team.

“I was cursing at him from where I was,” Hospital Corpsman Marcus Luttrell, the only survivor of the battle, later told The New York Times. “I was saying, ‘What are you doing?’ Then I realized that he was making a call. But then he started getting hit. He finished the call, picked up his rifle and started fighting again. But he was overrun.”

Lieutenant Murphy’s Medal of Honor Citation reads “For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as the leader of a special reconnaissance element with Naval Special Warfare Task Unit Afghanistan on 27 and 28 June 2005.”

While leading a mission to locate a high-level anti-coalition militia leader, Lieutenant Murphy demonstrated extraordinary heroism in the face of grave danger in the vicinity of Asadabad, Konar Province, Afghanistan. On 28 June 2005, operating in an extremely rugged enemy-controlled area, Lieutenant Murphy’s team was discovered by anti-coalition militia sympathizers, who revealed their position to Taliban fighters.

As a result, between 30 and 40 enemy fighters besieged his four-member team. Demonstrating exceptional resolve, Lieutenant Murphy valiantly led his men in engaging the large enemy force. The ensuing fierce firefight resulted in numerous enemy casualties, as well as the wounding of all four members of the team. Ignoring his own wounds and demonstrating exceptional composure, Lieutenant Murphy continued to lead and encourage his men.

When the primary communicator fell mortally wounded, Lieutenant Murphy repeatedly attempted to call for assistance for his beleaguered teammates. Realizing the impossibility of communicating in the extreme terrain, and in the face of almost certain death, he fought his way into open terrain to gain a better position to transmit a call. This deliberate, heroic act deprived him of cover, exposing him to direct enemy fire. Finally achieving contact with his Headquarters, Lieutenant Murphy maintained his exposed position while he provided his location and requested immediate support for his team.

In his final act of bravery, he continued to engage the enemy until he was mortally wounded, gallantly giving his life for his country and for the cause of freedom. By his selfless leadership, courageous actions, and extraordinary devotion to duty, Lieutenant Murphy reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

~~~~~~~~~

“…cherish tenderly the memories of our heroic dead who made their breast a barricade between our country and its foes.”

2 Million Bikers to DC's photo.

These are but two stories of the thousands of heroes who gave their lives for their fellow soldiers and their country. Remember to pay your respects to those who paid the ultimate sacrifice defending our country this Memorial Day.

~Kathy

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4 Responses to Memorial Day – A Time of Remembrance

  1. Hardnox says:

    Thanks for posting this Kathy.

  2. Hardnox says:

    This just in from Skip:

    A true story about 19 marines killed on an island (defending against the Japanese).The survivors had to retreat, so asked the islanders to please bury their dead for them.

    . Years later, they checked and found a man who had been a teenager then and remembered where they were buried. They sent a C130 and an honor guard over there and found all 19 had been buried with their helmets on, their rifles in their hands, in perfect condition. The islanders had really done a wonderful job. As they were loading the bodies on the aircraft, a voice from out of nowhere started singing The Marine Hymn”……….gave everyone goose bumps. Turns out, the voice was from a man who spoke no English but remembered a song the Marines taught him when they landed.

    They got all 19 and their photos are at the end.

    This of course was WW2! IF YOU HAVEN’T SEEN THIS – BE SURE YOU’RE SITTING DOWN. THIS ONE OF THOSE GESTURES FOR WHICH THERE ARE NO WORDS.

  3. CW says:

    Great post, Kathy. Most of us will never know that kind of bravery first hand.