Some GOOD News From Detroit.

Today was sentencing for the corrupt democrat former mayor of Detroit, Kwame Kilpatrick.

In a move that came as a surprise to me, the judge NAILED him.

From The Detroit News.com

 

October 10, 2013 at 3:39 pm

Kilpatrick sentence: 28 years

Judge on ex-mayor: ‘This man chose to waste his talents’

  • Jim Lynch and Robert Snell
  • The Detroit News

And AWAY he goes, for 28 years, or until the BECS pardons his ass upon leaving the White Crib.

Sound advice for the former thug-in-chief.

Detroit — Kwame Kilpatrick has been sentenced to serve 28 years in prison for crimes of racketeering and conspiracy committed during his six years as the mayor of Detroit. That sentence was just handed down in U.S. federal court by Judge Nancy Edmunds.

Edmunds said she was required to issue a sentence that is “sufficient but not greater than necessary” for a criminal enterprise that ran from Kilpatrick’s time in the state House to the mayor’s office. She described the former mayor as a larger-than-life character who helped himself to a jet-setting lifestyle. A significant sentence, she said, sends the message that corruption won’t be tolerated.

Kilpatrick appeared stunned on hearing his sentence, and a few in the courtroom crowd could be heard saying “Oh no.” If he serves the entirety of the 28 years, the 43-year-old would be 71 when he walks out of prison.

After declining to testify on his own behalf during the trial, Kilpatrick spoke before Edmunds made her ruling. It was an emotional and occasionally apologetic speech that included the admission: “I really messed up.”

“We’ve been stuck in this town for a very long time dealing with me,” he said. “I’m ready to go so the city can move on.”

His speech touched on a variety of subjects from his time in office and beyond, including:

■His affair with his former Chief of Staff Christine Beatty: “I was mad at people for finding out.”

■His own shortcomings: “It was pride and ego that took over. I couldn’t lose.”

■His resignation from office: “I didn’t realize then that I beat down the spirit and energy and vibrance of what was going on in the city.”

■His father, Bernard Kilpatrick: “He’s a real good man.”

■Stealing money from the city: “I’ve never done that.”

■The City of Detroit: “I want the city to be great again,” and to have a feeling “like it had during the 2006 SuperBowl.”

■His mother Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick’s term in office: “I killed her career.”

 

It did not take long for reactions to being coming in. Within minutes of the sentencing announcement, Oakland County Executive L. Brooks Patterson took to his Twitter account, writing:

“What bothers me most is the sacrifice of a potentially brilliant career.#KwameKilpatrick”

“They guy was intelligent, charismatic and greedy as hell.#KwameKilpatrick.”

“This is the end of a long Greek tragedy.#KwameKilpatrick.”

Barbara McQuade, the U.S. Attorney who oversaw Kilpatrick’s prosecution said: “This is an historic day in City of Detroit. … It’s a powerful sentence and it sends a powerful message, I think, that the people of Detroit won’t tolerate this abuse of the public trust.”

As for Kilpatrick’s speech in court, McQuade had a mixed review.

“At the end of the day he did not accept responsibility for stealing from the people.”

Prior to Kilpatrick’s address, his attorneys went to bat for him, saying he should not be punished for the sins of the city’s last 50 years. Their client, they said, hopes to use his ability and talents productively in the future. Kilpatrick’s legal team had pushed for their client to receive no more than 15 years and had asked the judge to send him to prison in Texas where his wife and children now live.

Given their turn, prosecutors called Kilpatrick’s collected misdeeds “one of the most significant cases of public corruption … in the entire country.”

The former mayor arrived in the courtroom just after 10 a.m., handcuffed and in khaki prison attire. During the early portion of the hearing, he appeared subdued, sitting with his elbows on the defense table as his attorneys argued he should receive no more than 15 years.

Prosecutors and defense attorneys haggled over the estimated $9.6 million in profits reaped by Kilpatrick and co-defendant contractor Bobby Ferguson in their racketeering scheme. After hearing roughly 20 minutes of arguments on that key point, U.S. District Judge Nancy Edmunds set a conservative estimate of $4.6 million for sentencing purposes.

Family members, many of whom sat through large portions of his trial, were not on hand, including wife, Carlita, and his parents, Bernard and Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick.

Jurors found Kilpatrick, once the city’s favorite political son, guilty of 24 counts of misconduct — including racketeering and conspiracy — during his time in office. Today, seven months after the verdict, he faced the possibility of a prison term that could have kept him incarcerated for the remainder of his life.

The courtroom at the Theodore Levin federal courthouse in downtown Detroit began filling up with attorneys and observers more than an hour ahead of the 10 a.m. start time for Thursday’s sentencing. Kilpatrick arrived at 9:25 a.m. in the company of the U.S. Marshall’s Service after being transported from prison in Milan.

That final decision will be made by Edmunds, who oversaw the trial involving Kilpatrick and co-defendants Ferguson and Bernard Kilpatrick — a trial that ran for six months.

Andrew Arena, director of the Detroit Crime Commission and former head of the Detroit FBI, said Kilpatrick and Ferguson did themselves no favors.

“What’s not helping these guys was the fact they were committing crimes during the trial, hiding money,” he said. “(The judge must) send a message. These sentences (of public officials) used to be 10-12 months. I think now the court is trying to send a message that this is unacceptable.”

Ferguson’s sentencing is scheduled for Friday.

Kilpatrick and Ferguson were convicted of charges related to running a criminal enterprise and dipping into the city treasury to fund lifestyles that included custom-made suits, private jet travel and luxury resort stays.

In court documents filed earlier this month, prosecutors wrote: “Kwame Kilpatrick was entrusted by the citizens of Detroit to guide their city through one of its most challenging periods. The city desperately needed resolute leadership. Instead it got a mayor looking to cash in on his office through graft, extortion and self-dealing.”

Of Ferguson, they wrote: “It was Ferguson, rather than Kilpatrick, who was the ‘boots on the ground’ of the extortion enterprise, directly issuing threats to the local business people.”

~

I really can’t think of a better sentence, unless one added on about 50 more years. The last sentence of the article bothers me, though. The prosecutors saying that Ferguson was the “boots on the ground” tells me they think Kwame was NOT the mastermind of this criminal enterprise requires the willing suspension of disbelief.

Another thing that boggles my mind, is ALL the leftist media morons in Detroit are MOURNING this goddamn criminal getting sentenced to prison at ALL, let alone 28 years.

Just another example of when a liberal democrat gets nailed, the left circle the wagons, when someone on the RIGHT gets nailed, WE help tar and feather the miscreant.

I applaud Judge Edmunds for her, in the face of ENORMOUS pressure from the leftist community of Detroit to “go easy” on the thug, her decision to slam his ass hard.

Almost as much as his NEW “homies” will slam it if he doesn’t heed the sage advice of the aerial banner above.

~

Clyde

 

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16 Responses to Some GOOD News From Detroit.

  1. Great article, Clyde. I thought he’d been salted and hung up to dry already~! But wow~! FINALLY, some justice begins to be seen in the arena of political graft~!

    But this paragraph puzzles me, as it doesn’t relate to anything near it: “That final decision will be made by Edmunds, who oversaw the trial involving Kilpatrick and co-defendants Ferguson and Bernard Kilpatrick — a trial that ran for six months.”

    WHAT “final decision” ???

  2. Kathy says:

    Good stuff, Clyde. Sometimes there is justice in the world. Meanwhile, Obama is writing them a check on our account. We get to pay them back for what this guy took.

  3. Hardnox says:

    Good news indeed. You’re right though… the left circles their wagon while the right forms a circular firing squad.

  4. gunnyginalaska says:

    VERY FEW Black politicians are worse a fk and those are on the Right. 100% of ALL politicians on the Left are corrupt.

    Obama endorsed this clown which is a hoot.

    • Clyde says:

      “Obama endorsed this clown which is a hoot.” Indeed he did, Guns, and THAT is why I firmly believe the BECS WILL pardon the sonofabitch on the way out the door. Thanks for dropping in.

  5. Terry says:

    He can now use his “abilities and talent productively” making license plates and pleasuring his cell block mates.

  6. Mrs AL says:

    What a sad state of affairs. This country is so filled with corruption and it’s going to do us in. This story just highlights that, Clyde.

    • Clyde says:

      Well, Mrs. Al, it COULD be stopped, IF we can EVER get to the point of the damnable MEDIA not propping up these criminals, along with guilty white liberals, AND, even more importantly, TERM LIMITS. Sad indeed, but NO ONE held a gun to this thug’s head to STEAL from the citizens of Detroit, and Michigan. Thanks for the comment.

  7. Buck says:

    So what’s the holdup for going after corrupt politicians on the national stage…
    Oh, yeah, ….Holder.

  8. myfoxmystere says:

    I’m torn on whether this ape thug should be sent to Texas or kept in Michigan. I’m leaning towards keeping this flea ridden ape thug in Michigan, so that when he drops the soap and bends over, Tiny, Momo and Big Bubba will give him a Chrissy Matthews Tingle up his L’eggs! Prison will be great for Kwame, because he can have his “steaks” and eat them too! On the other hand, the steaks will be quite chewy for him. His boifriend Irl Hudnutt is devastated and reeling over the sentencing.